Best foods for increasing low testosterone

People with low testosterone may be able to raise their levels by eating certain foods, such as ginger, fatty fish, and some vegetables.

Testosterone is a male sex hormone that plays a role in fertility, sexual function, bone health, and muscle mass.

A person’s testosterone level will fall naturally with age — by 1 to 2 percent per year — but some medical conditions, lifestyle choices, and other factors can influence the amount of this hormone in the body.

Males with severe zinc deficiency may develop hypogonadism, in which the body does not produce enough testosterone. They may also experience impotence or delayed sexual maturation.

People can also find the mineral in:

  • other shellfish
  • red meat
  • poultry
  • beans
  • nuts

It is important to note that zinc and copper compete for absorption. Take care when choosing supplements to avoid consuming too much of either mineral.

Some medical treatments can raise low testosterone levels, especially in younger men, but a person can also encourage the body to produce more by making some changes to the diet and lifestyle.

People have used ginger for medicinal and culinary purposes for centuries. Modern research indicates that this root may improve fertility in men.

According to the findings of a 2012 study, taking a daily ginger supplement for 3 months increased testosterone levels by 17.7 percent in a group of 75 adult male participants with fertility issues. The authors suggested that ginger may also improve sperm health in other ways.

Authors of a study from 2013 report that ginger increased testosterone and antioxidant levels in a diabetic rat model in just 30 days.

The pomegranate is an age-old symbol of fertility and sexual function, and its antioxidant levels may support heart health and stress reduction.

Also, results of a study from 2012 indicate that pomegranate may boost testosterone levels in men and women. Sixty healthy participants drank pure pomegranate juice for 14 days, and researchers tested the levels of testosterone in their saliva three times a day.

At the end of the study period, both male and female participants displayed an average 24 percent increase in salivary testosterone levels. They also experienced improvements in mood and blood pressure.

Vegetables such as spinach, Swiss chard, and kale are rich in magnesium, a mineral that may increase the body’s level of testosterone.

Authors of a study from 2011 found that taking magnesium supplements for 4 weeks prompted an increase in testosterone levels of sedentary participants and those who were athletes. The testosterone increases were greater, however, in the active participants.

Other good dietary sources of magnesium are:

 

California now has the most polluted cities in the world


Due to the wildfires raging in Northern California, San Francisco, Stockton and Sacramento were the world’s three “most polluted cities” on Friday morning, according to Berkeley Earth, a nonprofit that aggregates data from air-quality monitoring sites.

PurpleAir, which has a network of sensors around the world, also showed that California had worse air than traditional smog hotspots in India and China.
CNN meteorologist Brandon Miller confirmed that “no region on Earth had as many air quality stations in the highest ranges” of particulate matter, or PM, the toxic mixture of particles and droplets that worsens after wildfires.
Those values, he said, “stretched for hundreds of miles over Northern and Central California, from the mountains to the valleys and the coast.”

Some call cancellations ‘too little, too late’

San Francisco’s transit agency has taken its cable cars off the streets, several schools have canceled classes, and the National Park service suspended tours to Alcatraz Island.
Public schools in San Francisco and Alameda County were closed Friday, along with UC Davis and UC Merced. UC Berkeley also canceled Friday’s classes, but some students criticized the university’s decision to stay open Thursday as smoke descended on the campus.

Wildfire smoke and your health: Do you need to worry?

Wildfire smoke and your health: Do you need to worry?
The school’s student association wrote a letter to their chancellor denouncing the “administration’s insufficient response to these public health risks” and urging administrators to allocate emergency funds for masks and mobile air filtration units.
“Campus buildings are not equipped to filter out the pollutants making the air indoors just as harmful as it is outside,” the group wrote. Some students, even those without pre-existing conditions, said they felt sick.
“I had a bloody throat, bloody nose, a cough, dry and watering eyes, and my throat is still very sore and dry,” freshman Sabrina Thorn said. “I almost passed out trying to go to class yesterday. My professor told me to go home.”

Staying safe in the smoke

Particulate matter is the “number one environmental killer in the world,” Jacob said, and “the levels that are present in those areas affected by wildfires are like you might expect on a very polluted day in China or India.”
Smoke from fires releases particles small enough to make their way through our nose and into our lungs, Jaffe added, and “young children and the elderly have the greatest risks for immediate health concerns.”
PM can aggravate asthma, decrease lung function and increase the risk of cardiovascular events such as stroke, according to a study published last year in the Lancet. And because children with developing airways breathe more air per pound of body weight than adults, they can experience more severe symptoms.
“We give people advice to say indoors and to reduce exercise and things like that,” Jaffe said, “but those don’t mitigate the problem too much.” That’s especially true in San Francisco, where many don’t have air conditioning.
Without any sort of “controlled system” to filter air, Jaffe said, a building doesn’t offer much protection against particulate matter. When air is properly filtered, though, people can “reduce their PM exposure by about 90%” by being inside, he said.